For the best benefit…

Richard, I read the Blogs on the website and noticed that most of them referred to RV towing. I would like to offer a couple of other viewpoints from my perspective.

I actually tow my wife's Corolla with my Toyota Highlander, which is equipped with a factory installed tow package and hitch, and is fully factory rated for towing 5,000 pounds. My wife loves her car and wants to be able to use it when we're south for the winter months.

When towing, I hardly know that the “EZE-TOW” dolly and Corolla is attached as Highlander, with the tow package, has great acceleration.

The fuel economy is about 18 mpg at Interstate highway speeds of 70 MPH.  Normally, I would get 23 MPH without the dolly. That still makes it much less expensive then driving both cars, and we can share driving as well. For both vehicles to average 18 mpg, each would have to get 36 mpg, so I do save gas too.

Now for the best benefit. It would cost me $800 each way to have the Corolla transported from NY to FL each year. The tow dolly paid for itself in ONE year!!  Also, we can use the Corolla for extra storage for the stuff we bring down for the season, putting two coolers in the back seat, for food and frozen stuff. (We use dry ice for that one).

In FL, the cost of storing a trailer, if used to transport the Corolla, is about $120/mo! The dolly stays right in the front of my driveway, saving that expense as well.

The Corolla uses a smart key ignition system. HOWEVER, a "dumb" key can be made for a few dollars and used to keep the steering column unlocked. A dumb key is also good for unlocking the door if your regular keys got locked inside the car. When I leave the Corolla hitched overnight, I remove the key just to make sure it's not causing battery drainage. I then put the key in front of the Highlander's speedometer, to remind me that I need to install it prior to restarting my trip.

When driving and applying the brakes, I can feel the “EZE-TOW” dolly brakes actually providing additional braking, which is very good. With the dolly brakes being applied a little more aggressively then the towing vehicle, it helps keeping the vehicle straight with no tendency to fish tail. I didn't see this mentioned anywhere in the Blog.

Lastly, to control surface rust, there is a product called Chassis Saver. It's designed to paint right over surface rust and comes in basic colors such as black and silver. I used it on my old chain-link fence and it's amazing even after a full year of upstate NY weather.

I also used it on thirty year old galvanized metal chimney exterior for my wood stove, and it made it look like brand new, even after a full year. (It's triple wall pipe with a stainless steel interior).

The Chassis Saver converts the surface rust as well as providing a protective coating so there's no rust bleeding through afterward. All that's needed is to use a wire brush to get rid of the loose rust and scale. The black product will eventually dull and they recommend an overcoat of standard enamel. It's not cheap stuff, but like any good product, you get what you pay for. The silver stuff is amazing on coverage since it has a very high percentage of solids, in the 90% range. It's primary market is for restoration of vintage autos.

Regards, Nick Abbatiello

The "dumb" key will turn the lock mechanism and open a door or trunk, but will not allow the engine to run (no ignition). The "dumb" key will allow you to turn the column lock mechanism so the steering wheel to the first detente position and will allow the wheel to turn freely.

In the first position, it only unlocks the column, the next position, activates the accessories such as the radio and will drain the battery if left on. I use the "dumb" key and place the column switch in the first position, which is detented and remains there as long as the key is in the lock. The key must be rotated counter-clockwise to the "off"

position to remove the key and lock the column.

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